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(Aug 01, 2017)
AGRICULTURE – EDUCATION – FINANCE - SEA INDUSTRY – HEALTH – INFRASTRUCTURE – ENERGY - INDUSTRY & TRADE – MINING – SPORTS – TRANSPORT – COMMUNICATION – TOURISM – WATER -  info-gov@guinebissaurepublic.com More Details
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History & Geography


The population of Guinea-Bissau is ethnically diverse and has many distinct languages, customs, and social structures. Guinea-Bissauans can be divided into the following ethnic groups: Fula and the Mandingo-speaking people, who comprise the largest portion of the population and are concentrated in the north and northeast; the Balanta and Papel people, who live in the southern coastal regions; and the Manjaco and Mancanha, who occupy the central and northern coastal areas. Most of the remainder are mestiços of mixed Portuguese and African descent, including a Cape Verdean minority.

Portuguese natives comprise a very small percentage of Guinea-Bissauans. This deficit was directly caused by the exodus of Portuguese settlers that took place after Guinea-Bissau gained independence. The country has a tiny Chinese population, including those of mixed Portuguese and Chinese ancestry from Macau, a former Asian Portuguese colony.

Only 14% of the population speaks the official language, Portuguese. 44% speak Kriol, a Portuguese-based Creole language, and the remainder speaks native African languages. Most Portuguese and Mestiços speak one of the African languages and Kriol as second languages. French is learned in schools, as the country is surrounded by French-speaking countries and is a full member of the Francophone.

Throughout the 20th century, most Bissau-Guineans practiced some form of Animism. Recently, many have adopted Islam, which is currently practiced by 50% of the country's population; most of Guinea-Bissau's Muslims practice Sunni Islam. Approximately 10 percent of the country's population belongs to the Christian community, and 40% continue to hold Indigenous beliefs. These statistics can be misleading, however, as both Islamic and Christian practices may be largely influenced and enriched by syncretism with traditional African beliefs.

Regions and sectors

Guinea-Bissau is divided into 8 regions (regiões) and one autonomous sector (sector autónomo). These in turn are subdivided into thirty-seven sectors. The regions are:

Guinea-Bissau lies mostly between latitudes 11° and 13°N (a small area is south of 11°), and longitudes 13° and 17°W. At 36,125 square kilometers (13,948 sq mi), the country is larger in size than Taiwan, Belgium, or the U.S. state of Maryland. This small, tropical country lies at a low altitude; its highest point is 300 meters (984 ft). The interior is savanna, and the coastline is plain with swamps of Guinean mangroves. Its monsoon-like rainy season alternates with periods of hot, dry harmattan winds blowing from the Sahara. The Bijagos Archipelago extends out to sea.

Main cities in Guinea-Bissau include:


Rank City Population(1979 census) Population(2005 Estimate) Region
1 Bissau 109,214 388,028 Bissau
2 Bafatá 13,429 22,521 Bafatá
3 Bafatá 7,803 14,430 Gabú
4 Bissorã N/A 12,688  Oio
5 Bolama 9,100 10,769 Bolama
6 Cacheu6 7,600 10,490 Cacheu
7 Bolama 8,400 9,941 Bubaque
8 Catió 5,170 9,898 Tombali
9 Mansôa 5,390 7,821 Oio
10 Buba N/A 7,779 Quinara
11 Quebo N/A 7,072 Quinara
12 Canchungo 4,965 6,853 Bubaque
13 Farim 4,468 6,792 Oio
14 Quinhámel N/A 3,128 Biombo
15 Fulacunda N/A 1,327 Quinara


Bissau/Guinea-Bissau

Guinea-Bissau is warm all year around and there is little temperature fluctuation; it averages 26.3 °C (79.3 °F). The average rainfall for Bissau is 2,024 millimeters (79.7 in) although this is almost entirely accounted for during the rainy season which falls between June and September/October. From December through April, the country experiences drought.

 

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